Last edited by Dokasa
Monday, October 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Folklore Survey of County Clare found in the catalog.

Folklore Survey of County Clare

T.J Westropp

Folklore Survey of County Clare

by T.J Westropp

  • 362 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Folklore -- County Clare.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementT.J.Westropp.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18719448M

    Collectanea. classes at Scattery and along both banks of the river, at Kilkee, Kilmihil, and round Doolough and Miltown Malbay. In the fifteenth-century details of the " Cathedral " of Scattery a large- eyed dragon with crocodile jaws is conspicuous ; there was another carving at Kilrush ; and a third, — the " pattern-stone " removed from Scattery and until lately at Kilkee, — showed. The Soul Cages is a fairy tale invented by Thomas Keightley, originally published as a piece of genuine Irish folktale in T. Crofton Croker's Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland (–28). It features a male merrow (merman) inviting a local fisherman to his undersea home. The 'soul cages' in the title refer to a collection of human souls that the merman kept in his home.

    and it is mentioned again in Thomas J. Westropp's, A Folklore Survey of County Clare, published in , in which he states that a pattern took place at St. Martin's Well in Clarefield."1 As already stated, the folklore record, especially the responses to the questionnaire,'2 indicated that veneration of St. Martin's well took. Achill Island (/ ˈ æ k əl /; Irish: Acaill, Oileán Acla) in County Mayo is the largest of the Irish isles, and is situated off the west coast of has a population of 2, Its area is km 2 (57 sq mi). Achill is attached to the mainland by Michael Davitt Bridge, between the villages of Gob an Choire (Achill Sound) and Poll Raithní ().A bridge was first completed here in

      – Whitegate, Co. Clare: Clare Young Environmentalists, Hencken, Hugh O\’Neill, – Cahercommaun: a stone fort in County Clare / by H. O\’Neill Hencken. – Dublin: The Royal society of antiquaries of Ireland, – (Extra volume of the Royal. International Society for Ethnology and Folklore, Kommission für. EMIGRATION RECORDS + Clare County Library; TITHE APPLOTMENT BOOKS + National Archives of Ireland; GRIFFITHS VALUATION OF IRELAND + Clare County Library; NATIONAL FOLKLORE COLLECTION + ; NATIONAL FOLKLORE COLLECTION + ; NATIONAL FOLKLORE COLLECTION + ; Census Census + Irish Ancestors.


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Folklore Survey of County Clare by T.J Westropp Download PDF EPUB FB2

Folklore of Clare: A folklore survey of County Clare and County Clare folk-tales and myths on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Folklore of Clare: A folklore survey of County Clare and County Clare folk-tales and myths.

Nine of these articles formed ‘A Folklore Survey of County Clare’, which is presented here, and four others formed ‘County Clare Fol k-Tales and Myths’.

Clare County Library wishes to thank Clare Local Studies Project for preparation of raw text for this publication. Get this from a library. Folklore of Clare: a folklore survey of County Clare and County Clare folk-tales and myths.

[Thomas J Westropp; Gearóid Ó Crualaoich; Folklore Society (Great Britain)]. A FOLKLORE SURVEY OF COUNTY CLARE. (WITH PLATE XI.1).

COUNTY CLARE from the fourth century of our era was united politically with North Munster, Tuath Mumhain, or Thomond, though separated from it by the broad waters of the Shannon.

Standing. any folklore about this creature in the county. There was said to be a "remarkable" otter at Glenomera. Cat.-The cat was much regarded by the early Irish, and holds honourable place in their ancient code of laws.

It even appears in the illuminations of the Book of Kells. Numerous places in Clare bear its name, but local belief tends to consider. A FOLKLORE SURVEY OF COUNTY CLARE (concluded).

Earthworks and Buildings. FAIRY forts and mounds have been dealt with in Section iv., haunted houses in Section viii., and foundation sacrifices in Section xi.

Forts.-The ring walls and mounds in County Clare are pro-bably residential, or, more rarely, sepulchral, but certainly not military. It was in this volume that Westropp began his Co.

Clare contributions with the observation that his survey would show ‘many traces of ancient beliefs still surviving’ and record the mythology and sagas of early days in the place-names and the legends still then current in the oral narrative and tradition of the county.

A Folklore Survey of County Clare by Thomas Johnson Westropp. is a lough péist which kills men and hounds, and ‘The Book of Feenagh’ tells of ‘Loc na pesti,’ where a hideous péist slew youths as they bathed.

The ‘Seanchus Mór’ has a lake monster, the Murdris, which expands and contracts like a smith’s bellows. Religious Objects and their Legends. Clare was once rich in religious objects, and some important ones have survived until our times, such as the Bell Shrine of St.

Senan, the croziers of St. Blathmac of Rath and St. Tola of Dysert O’Dea, and the Bells of Rath, Burren, and Kilshanny,—all, except the last, in the collection of the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin, besides the reputed bell of.

‘Ordnance Survey Letters,’ (Co. Clare), vol. i., p. Hely Dutton, ‘Statistical Survey of the County of Clare,’ p. The smith was a magician amongst the Irish, and the ancient ‘St. Patrick's Lorica’ prays against the spells of ‘smiths, women, and druids.’ So. A FOLKLORE SURVEY OF COUNTY CLARE (continued).

IN a preceding article I have dealt with place names and legends of names, banshees, the death coach, and fairies, and in the present one I propose to deal mainly with other appearances of a spectral or spiritual character.

In. A FOLKLORE SURVEY OF COUNTY CLARE (continued from p. 60). XII. Lucky and Unlucky Deeds. IT is unlucky to see the new moon through glass; to throw dust or slops out of a house on New Year's Day, as you throw away with them all the good luck of the year; to throw dust or slops towards a neighbouring "fort";l to see one magpie, or.

A FOLKLORE SURVEY OF COUNTY CLARE (continued from p. XVI. Patterns and Religious Rites. THE three chiefpatterns, (or religious rites at wells and holy places), were held on Iniscatha or Scattery Island in the Shannon, at Killone near Ennis, and on Iniscaltra in Lough Derg.

To all three thousands of persons came from Clare, Kerry, and more. A Folklore Survey of County Clare by Thomas Johnson Westropp Place Names and Legends of Places County Clare from the fourth century of our era was united politically with North Munster, Tuath Mumhain, or Thomond, though separated from it by the broad waters of the Shannon.

A Folklore Survey of County Clare County Clare Folk-Tales and Myths Legends of the County Clare Customs, Lore and Legend of Other Clare Days James Delargy and the Storymen of North Clare Curses on the McInerney family of Co Clare by Luke McInerney The Schools' Folklore Scheme by Maura Egan.

"History and Archaeology", The Clare Island Survey () Westropp includes some folklore with his descriptions of the archaeological and historical monuments. John MacNeill. "Place-names and Family Names", The Clare Island Survey () Not strictly folklore. Folklore of Clare: a Folklore Survey of County Clare & County Clare Folk-tales and Myths, Clasp Press,ISBN reprint of A Folklore Survey of County Clare and County Clare Folk-Tales and Myths, published / in Folk Lore: Transactions of the Folklore.

County Clare (County) on The Modern Antiquarian, the UK & Ireland's most popular megalithic community website. 1 news item, 2 pieces of folklore, 4 weblinks, plus information on many more ancient sites nearby and across the UK & Ireland.

Kincaid, C. A.: Folk Tales of Sind and Guzrat, Oxford University Press, ; Indian Reprint: New Order Book Company, Ahmedabad, WORKS IN SINDHI Baloch, N. Edmund Lenihan (born ), also known as Eddie Lenihan, is an Irish author, storyteller, lecturer and broadcaster. He is one of the few practising seanchaithe (traditional Irish lore-keepers and tale-spinners) remaining in Ireland.

He has been called "one of the greatest of. County Clare has a rich heritage of myths and legends which is uniquely captured in this collection of traditional tales from the county. Discover the tales surrounding the tomb of the sun goddess Grianne in the village that bears her name, the caves where warrior giants are said to sleep, and the strange creatures that were said to inhabit the lakes/5(2).2 days ago  The latest book on the subject Earthing the Myths: The Myths, Legends and Early History of Ireland by Daragh Smyth (Irish Academic Press, €) is a county-by-county guide to sites covering.Chapter Measuring Heads, Bodies and Evaluating Family Farming and Occupational Continuities: Revisiting the Harvard Anthropological Survey of County Clare/Ireland Chapter A Lifetime in Hurling, by Jimmy Smyth Chapter Traditional Music in County Clare, by Niall Keegan Chapter ‘A Dub in Clare’: Tom Munnelly, Folklore.